Auto repair

June 12, 2018

While there have been many advances in automotive technology over the years, and car prices have remained reasonable (especially when one considers the added convenience and safety features, now standard, that used to be optional or not available at all), I think both manufacturers and consumers have paid little attention to costs of ownership, particularly repairs and maintenance.

I recently noticed a small scratch and dent on one of my car’s doors.  The damage was not extensive, but was unsightly enough for me to want to have it repaired.

My collision deductible is $100, and I knew the repair cost would exceed that.  What shocked me was when I received an estimate for over $800.  The repair ended up costing over $1500, plus over $300 for a rental car that my insurance covered for the time it and the body shop dickered over the cost of the repair and the time it took to complete the repair.

I was only out $100, and I had the use of a car while mine was in the shop, so what’s the problem?  Like health care, another area where many have insurance, the problem falls disproportionately upon those who do not.  In addition, the cost of insurance for everyone must reflect the inflated prices of repairs and parts.

Also, as in health care, when one does not pay directly out of pocket, on is not likely to actively seek lower prices.

Decades ago, I recall that the insurance industry, through a lobbying and advertising campaign, sought common-sense changes in auto design that would help contain repair costs, such as standardizing bumper heights, requiring bumpers to meet crash resistance standards, and the like.  These efforts were fruitless, and now we all pay.

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